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Adults With Dyslexia: Learning Styles

Adults With Dyslexia: Learning Styles
Learning should be structured and multisensory. This bypasses the organizational difficulties in the brain; integrating all learning pathways helps to ensure automatic memory.

Overlearning is vital-practice until automatic. Adults with dyslexia often have short-term memory difficulties.

Use a variety of ways to practice spelling. Let adults choose the ones that work the best for them.

Work on one problem at a time.

Be aware that adults with dyslexia often "overload." Tune into this.
Use right brain skills-imagination, patterns, color and visualization-to augment learning.

New information needs to be given more than once, even if the adult appears to understand it.

Dyslexic adults often find it difficult to generalize.

Develop a holistic approach-another right brain strength. Adults with dyslexia like to know the whole and then are happy to tackle the part.

Work to the adult's strength-avoid reinforcing failure. Don't do dictation of words he or she can't spell.

Remind the dyslexic adult, if necessary, of a spelling strategy for as long as he or she needs you to.

Give time for the student to organize his or her thoughts.

Encourage the use of technology-spelling dictionaries, memory aids, etc.

Present learning materials in a variety of ways.

Adults who are dyslexic need to concentrate much more than other students because of their learning disability.

By recognizing and discussing the nature of their disability with them, we can enable adults with dyslexia to come to terms with their disability, put it in perspective and take control of their learning.

This information is from the Dyslexia 2000 Network and was compiled by Program Development Director Kathy Kuy.

Reprinted from http://web.wt.net/~jerrybro/lva/tips.htm

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