Florida Literacy CoalitionFlorida Literacy CoalitionFlorida Literacy Coalition

 

Become a Volunteer

 


Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a need for volunteer tutors?
How do I learn to tutor?
What are the qualifications to be a tutor?

Become a Volunteer
FAQs
Directory of Volunteer Opportunities
Online Tutor Training
Do I need to speak another language to teach English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)?
How much time does it take to tutor?
How is tutoring organized and set-up?
Where does tutoring take place?
How old are the students?
What if I need to travel or miss some tutoring sessions?
Do literacy programs have other volunteer opportunities in addition to tutoring?
How can I become a volunteer tutor?

 

Is there a need for volunteer tutors?
Yes. In many communities there are more students than there are teachers, so students are put on waiting lists. There is a need for tutors to work with adult learners to help them improve their reading, writing, math, and/or English language skills. Some instructors also help students prepare for the General Educational Development (GED) examination. Most of the literacy programs in Florida use tutors in a one-to-one setting, or in small groups [one tutor working with 2-6 students]. Many programs also have opportunities for tutors to assist teachers in a classroom, either roaming to help all the students, or working with one or more struggling students.

How do I learn to tutor?
Volunteers attend tutor-training workshops. These workshops, which are typically 12 to 16 hours long, introduce you to the techniques used in tutoring an adult and will cover a range of topics from the various core materials used in tutoring to designing a lesson plan.

What are the qualifications to be a tutor?
Tutors should be high school graduates or have a GED. Previous teaching experience is generally not required.

Do I need to speak another language to teach English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)?
No. The training workshops prepare you to work with a student with whom you do not share a common language.

How much time does it take to tutor?
Most programs request volunteers give 2-3 hours per week for 6+ months. However, many programs welcome seasonal volunteers for a shorter period of time.

How is tutoring organized and set-up?
Volunteers work with a tutor coordinator who will ask you what subject you would like to tutor, the type of student you would like to work with, and the times that you are available. With this information he or she will arrange for you to meet with an adult learner who has already been tested.

Where does tutoring take place?
The location for the tutoring can be just about anywhere including a community college, local library, business, or community center. Programs generally do not support in-home tutoring.

How old are the students?
Students are adults of all ages. Family literacy programs are also sometimes in need of tutors to work with children as well.

What if I need to travel or miss some tutoring sessions?
Programs understand that you will have scheduling conflicts. They just ask that you notify your student in advance.

Do literacy programs have other volunteer opportunities in addition to tutoring?
Yes. Most literacy organizations have a number of volunteer needs which may include proving administrative support, fundraising, interviewing students and serving on a board of directors.

How can I become a volunteer tutor?
Call the state literacy hotline at 1-800-237-5113 or e-mail us at info@floridaliteracy.org and we will provide you with information on volunteer literacy programs in your area.

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Ambassadors

The Florida Literacy Coalition thanks the Florida
Department of Education, Division of Career and Adult Education
for making this site possible.
 

.Florida Literacy Coalition
..235 Maitland Ave. S #102

Maitland, FL 32751
..Phone: (407)-246-7110
..Fax: (407)-246 - 7104

Florida Literacy Hotline
(800) - 237 - 5113